Review: We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan & Brian Conaghan

we-come-apartPublisher: Bloomsbury Childrens
Release date: March 1, 2017
Format: Paperback
Source: Publisher
Pages: 320
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Nicu has emigrated from Romania and is struggling to find his place in his new home. Meanwhile, Jess’s home life is overshadowed by violence. When Nicu and Jess meet, what starts out as friendship grows into romance as the two bond over their painful pasts and hopeful futures. But will they be able to save each other, let alone themselves?

For fans of Una LaMarche’s Like No Other, this illuminating story told in dual points of view through vibrant verse will stay with readers long after they’ve turned the last page.

MY THOUGHTS

5 stars

Thank you to Bloomsbury Australia for sending me a review copy of the book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

I have no words for how much I love this book. It was raw and honest and I could not have asked for anything more from it. I loved the themes of racism, immigration and love in the novel and it was just one of the most poignant stories I’ve read in a while.

We Come Apart is a story that is written in verse and from dual perspectives. If you’ve never read anything by Sarah Crossan, you must because her ability to tell stories in verse is out of this world. I’ve previously read One and The Weight of Water and they were both amazing. I haven’t read anything by Brian Conaghan but this book made me really excited to check out his solo work. I really loved the two perspectives in this book and I thought they worked wonderfully together. The book alternates perspectives every few pages and I really enjoyed this because it gave me a really good idea of what they were both thinking about a certain situation or event. The book doesn’t have headers telling us whose perspective we’re reading from but it’s completely clear who is speaking because the voices were so different.

Nicu, our male lead, is an immigrant from Romania and speaks in very disjointed English. I particularly loved his voice and never found it to be difficult to understand. The reason why I loved his voice so much was because he expressed every thought and feeling in a pure and honest manner because of his inability to speak English fluently. The way that he tried to describe his thoughts was just so unflinching and relatable that it was impossible not to love his voice and his character. I also highly enjoyed Jess. Her voice wasn’t as ‘meaningful’ to me as Nicu’s but I thought she was still a very relatable character and even though, she’s very different to who I am as a person, I still connected with her story and empathised deeply.

i was extremely taken by the story of We Come Apart. Jess and Nicu meet at a Reparation Scheme for juvenile offenders. They are both having trouble with their families and this draws the two of them together. Nicu’s family is staying temporarily in North London so that they can earn enough money to pay for teenage Nicu to take a wife back in his village in Romania. Despite his repeated protests, Nicu’s family has no interest in what Nicu wants and are determined for him to return to Romania and get married as soon as possible. Nicu wants badly to stay in London and get an education, but at school, he is severely bullied by his classmates and teachers for being different and a person of colour. Jess lives with her mother and abusive stepfather, who regularly forces Jess to video record while he beats up her mother. Jess’s mum doesn’t seem to have any intention of leaving and Jess isn’t strong enough to do anything about it either. She spends her days lashing out by stealing and engaging in behaviours that would be frowned upon. But when she meets Nicu, the two of them open up to each other and are there for each other. What I appreciated about this friendship and relationship was that there was a very natural and gradual development. The two don’t start off as fast friends but gradually develop into two people who understand each other. I loved the development in their characters and Jess’s change from being a prejudiced teen like her schoolmates to being a more tender and empathetic person.

If I had one small criticism, it would be that the ending of the book was a little bit rushed and not very resolved. I finished the book feeling like the authors left me hanging a little and would’ve liked more resolution. However, I was still extremely satisfied with how the book played out and how relevant the issues it explores are to society today. It’s an important story that needs to be read!

We Come Apart is released on March 1st, 2017 by Bloomsbury Australia. It is available at Australian retailers for $17.99.

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16 thoughts on “Review: We Come Apart by Sarah Crossan & Brian Conaghan

  1. Valerie says:

    Is it bad that I initially wanted to read this because it would be a fast read, and also in verse? (Also is One in verse as well? I read Apple and Rain by Sarah Crossan but didn’t like it as much as I wanted to) But I’m hoping this will turn out better for me!

    I’m glad you enjoyed this Jenna. I honestly didn’t expect this to be such heavy-hitting topics, but I think I can handle it. I hope.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Zoe says:

    Sarah Crossan’s One was one (ha!) of my favorite books of 2016 so I am so excited to read her next book. I’m glad you enjoyed it so much! Thanks for sharing and, as always, fabulous review! ❤

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Anisha @ Sprinkled Pages says:

    Unfortunately, I didn’t love this book as much as you did and only ended up giving it three stars! I feel this was mainly because I didn’t like the verse setting of it and it didn’t do anything for me. I also didn’t like Jess and wasn’t able to connect with Nicu! But so good to hear you enjoyed it Jenna and I’m glad you found it so amazing!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Ksenia says:

    I guess the lack of headers can be confusing, I’m glad to hear the voices were distinct. I’ve already told you that have a hard time with books written in verse in English, so I’m not sure this book is for me. Though it did sounds like a wonderful story that rise important topics. Great review, Jenna!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Jenna @ Reading with Jenna says:

      Thanks Ksenia! Verse books aren’t really for everyone so I totally get where you’re coming from. I personally love them and thought this one was done super well, despite the ending being a little rushed. I hope your reading month is going well!

      Like

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